Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women

Living away from home

Graphs

Number of children living away from home in home-based care, Queensland, as at 30 June 2007 to 2011 Number of children living away from home in home-based care, Queensland, as at 30 June 2014 to 2018

YearChildren living away from home
2007 5627
2008 6284
2009 6649
2010 6783
2011 6983

Proportion of children living away from home, by age group, Queensland, as at 30 June 2007 to 2011 Proportion of children living away from home, by age group, Queensland, as at 30 June 2014 to 2018

Year0 to 45 to 910 to 1415 to 17
2007 26.9 % 27.5 % 28.9 % 16.7 %
2008 26.8 % 28.7 % 28.6 % 15.9 %
2009 26.1 % 29.7 % 28.3 % 15.9 %
2010 24.8 % 30.2 % 28.5 % 16.6 %
2011 24 % 30.8 % 28.6 % 16.5 %

Proportion of children living away from home, by primary placement, Queensland, as at 30 June 2018

YearHome-based careResidential care servicesOther
2011 86.60548183 % 7.67704328 % 5.71747489 %

Number of children in out-of-home care, by Indigenous status, as at 30 June 2007 to 2011 Number of children in out-of-home care, by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, as at 30 June 2014 to 2018

YearIndigenousNon-IndigenousAll children
2007 1749 4223 5972
2008 2085 4585 6670
2009 2481 4612 7093
2010 2686 4664 7350
2011 2850 4752 7602

Tables

DescriptionAnnualQuarterly
LA.1: Children living away from home, by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 14 KB) Excel (CSV, 3 KB) Excel (XLSX, 17 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB)
LA.2: Children living away from home, by primary placement and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 19 KB) Excel (CSV, 3 KB) Excel (XLSX, 19 KB) Excel (CSV, 4 KB)
LA.3: Children living away from home, by sex and age group, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 14 KB) Excel (CSV, 3 KB) Excel (XLSX, 19 KB) Excel (CSV, 3 KB)
LA.4: Children living away from home and whether subject to a protective order, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 18 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB) Excel (XLSX, 18 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB)
LA.5: Children living away from home, by relationship to carer, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 19 KB) Excel (CSV, 3 KB) Excel (XLSX, 19 KB) Excel (CSV, 3 KB)
LA.6: Children living away from home, by region, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 13 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB) Excel (XLSX, 18 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB)
OHC.1: Children in out-of-home care, by primary placement and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 15 KB) Excel (CSV, 3 KB) Excel (XLSX, 15 KB) Excel (CSV, 4 KB)

Table notes

What is living away from home?

In conjunction with ongoing intervention, the department sometimes needs to remove a child from their home to ensure their safety.

A child may be removed from their home during the investigation and assessment phase, or during ongoing intervention. Removing a child from their home is a means to provide safety, support and a therapeutic environment.

When a child is placed in the custody or guardianship of the chief executive (Director-General) of the department, it is the department's responsibility to find an appropriate placement for the child.

The department uses various placement services for the children in its care including family-based care (foster, kinship and provisionally approved carers) and residential care services.

Wherever possible, the department seeks to place a child with extended family (kinship carers) in order to maintain family connections.

Children may also be living in other locations such as youth detention centres, mental health facilities, hospitals, as well as independent living arrangements.

When placing an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander child in care, a culturally appropriate placement is sought in accordance with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle placement hierarchy.

Why this topic is important

Some Queensland families are unable to provide a safe, secure and caring environment for their children. When this becomes apparent, the department must act to ensure that the response provided is in the best interests of the child or young person. If necessary, this can result in children and young people being placed away from home.

The number of children and young people living away from home increased by 2.4 per cent from 9,406 as at 30 June 2017 to 9,629 as at 30 June 2018. Over the last five years, the number of children living away from home has increased by 11.6 per cent from 8,631 as at 30 June 2014 to 9,629 as at 30 June 2018.

Of the 9,629 children living away from home as at 30 June 2018, 85.8 per cent (8,260) were in home-based care, 8.5 per cent were placed in a residential care service and 5.8 per cent were in other locations (including hospitals, Queensland youth detention centres, independent living and all other locations).

Of the 8,260 children placed in home-based care, 49.1 per cent (4,052) were placed with kin and 50.9 per cent (4,208) were placed with other family-based carers. The proportion of children in home based-care placed with kin increased from 43.9 per cent as at 30 June 2014 to 49.1 per cent as at 30 June 2018.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are significantly more likely to be living away from home than non- Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander children. At a rate per 1,000 children aged 0 to 17 years, 45.1 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were living away from home, compared with 5.1 non-Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander children as at 30 June 2017. The higher rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children has been a consistent trend over the last five years.

Children in out-of-home care

Data for the measure 'children in out-of-home care' is provided in Table OHC.1 (XLSX, 15 KB) Table OHC.1 (CSV, 3 KB). In accordance with nationally agreed reporting definitions, this measure includes only those children placed in foster care (including kinship care) or a residential care service.

The number of children in out-of-home care increased over the last year from 8,920 as at 30 June 2017 to 9,074 as at 30 June 2018 (an increase of 1.7 per cent). The number of children in out-of-home care has increased by 10.9 per cent since 30 June 2014, from 8,185 to 9,074 as at 30 June 2018.

Is your feedback

Please submit your comments on the department's Compliments and Complaints section.

Please submit your comments on the Queensland Government website Contacts form.