Ongoing intervention phase

Ongoing intervention - Child protection system framework phases

Ongoing intervention phase

Ongoing intervention by the department is required when it is determined that a child is in need of protection. In 2018-19, there were 4,189 substantiations where the child was assessed as in need of protection. When ongoing intervention is required, a case plan is developed in conjunction with the child or young person, their family and members of their Safety and Support Network.

Departmental intervention is often achieved without the need for a child protection order. Rather, the department will work with parental consent to meet the protection and care needs of the child. In these circumstances, it is essential that parents are both willing and able to work actively with the department.

A decision to work on an ongoing voluntary basis with a family requires opening an intervention with parental agreement case. In most cases the child will remain at home.

Where it is not possible for the department to work with parental agreement to protect a child, an application is made to the Childrens Court for a child protection order. A variety of order types can be granted by the court, including non-custodial orders, short-term custody or guardianship orders and long-term guardianship orders. Custody or guardianship can be granted to the Chief Executive (Director-General) of the department, or to a suitable person.

In conjunction with ongoing intervention, the department sometimes needs to remove a child from their home to ensure their safety. When a child needs to be removed from their home, the department uses various placement services including family based care (foster, kinship and provisionally approved carers) and residential care services.

Whenever possible, the department seeks to place a child or young person with extended family (kinship carers) in order to maintain family connections.

When placing an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander child in care, a culturally appropriate placement is sought in accordance with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle placement hierarchy.

Graphs

Number of children subject to ongoing intervention, by Indigenous status, Queensland, as at 30 June, 2008 to 2011Number of children subject to ongoing intervention, by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, Queensland, as at 30 June, 2015 to 2019

YearIndigenousNon-Indigenous
2008 2596 5667
2009 3606 7041
2010 3838 6768
2011 3891 6436

Tables

DescriptionAnnualQuarterly
OI.1: Children subject to ongoing intervention, by ongoing intervention type and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 19 KB) Excel (CSV, 3 KB) Excel (XLSX, 19 KB) Excel (CSV, 3 KB)
OI.2: Children subject to ongoing intervention, by ongoing intervention type and region, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 19 KB) Excel (CSV, 3 KB) Excel (XLSX, 19 KB) Excel (CSV, 4 KB)

The number of children subject to ongoing intervention increased from 12,114 as at 30 June 2018 to 12,391 as at 30 June 2019. Of the total number of children subject to ongoing intervention as at 30 June 2019, 2,095 children were subject to intervention with parental agreement (16.9 per cent) and 10,296 were subject to a child protection order (83.1 per cent).

Since 30 June 2015, the number of children subject to ongoing intervention has increased by 8.6 per cent. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children increased by 12.7 per cent from 4,749 as at 30 June 2015 to 5,354 as at 30 June 2019, and the number of non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children increased by 5.6 per cent over the same period from 6,662 to 7,037.

Performance information