Tailoring responses to meet the needs of vulnerable Queenslanders

The Queensland Government is committed to improving the safety of all victims of domestic and family violence, regardless of age, ability, cultural background or sexual orientation.

We are building the evidence base to inform the development of strategies to enhance protection and support for particular groups of people who are at higher risk of experiencing domestic and family violence, or who may face greater challenges and barriers in accessing support.

Review into elder abuse

In response to recommendation 11 in the Not Now, Not Ever report, the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services has commissioned Curtin University to undertake a review into the prevalence and characteristics of elder abuse.

This work examines and reviews current policy, legislation and service responses to elder abuse in Queensland in order to provide a snapshot of the current context as well as an evidence base to better understand the prevalence and characteristics of elder abuse in the state.

The findings will help inform prevention and communication strategies and improved responses to elder abuse in Queensland.

Review into the impacts of domestic and family violence on people with disability

In accordance with recommendation 10 in the Not Now, Not Ever report, the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services has commissioned People with Disability Australia to conduct research to better understand the impact of domestic and family violence on people with disability.

This will increase understanding of access, availability and service integration issues impacting on people with disability experiencing domestic and family violence.

Queensland Language Services Guidelines

Professionals working with vulnerable or traumatised clients are often at risk of experiencing ongoing stress, burnout, compassion fatigue and work-induced trauma. Work-induced trauma can also be experienced by those from the broader domestic and family violence support network, including interpreters.

Based on recommendation 44 in the Not Now, Not Ever report, the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services reviewed the Queensland Language Services Guidelines to include information about briefing interpreters before communication with the customer occurs. This applies to domestic and family violence cases where the interpreter may experience trauma as a result of the engagement.