Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women

Short-term child protection orders

Graphs

Number of children subject to short-term child protection orders, by Indigenous status, Queensland, as at 30 June, 2007 to 2011 Number of children subject to short-term child protection orders, by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, Queensland, as at 30 June, 2013 to 2017

YearIndigenousNon-Indigenous
2007 1267 2659
2008 1425 2784
2009 1681 2897
2010 1700 2543
2011 1659 2409

Rate of children subject to short-term child protection orders, per 1,000 children aged 0-17 years, by Indigenous status, as at 30 June, 2007 to 2011 Rate of children subject to short-term child protection orders, per 1,000 children aged 0-17 years, by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, as at 30 June, 2013 to 2017

YearIndigenousNon-Indigenous
2007 18.9 2.8
2008 21 2.9
2009 24.6 3
2010 24.4 2.5
2011 23.7 2.4

Tables

DescriptionAnnualQuarterly
ST.1: Children subject to short-term child protection orders, by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 17 KB) Excel (XLSX, 18 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB)
ST.2: Children subject to short-term child protection orders, by age group and sex, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 16 KB) Excel (XLSX, 19 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB)
ST.3: Children subject to short-term child protection orders, by region, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 16 KB) Excel (XLSX, 18 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB)

Table notes

What are short-term child protection orders?

When the protection needs of a child cannot be met through intervention with parental agreement, the department makes a recommendation to the Director of Child Protection Litigation to seek a child protection order through the Childrens Court to meet the needs of the child.

A child protection order is not sought if there are other ways to protect the child, such as working actively with the family to resolve the problems that led to the significant harm or risk of harm, or connecting the family to a community support agency.

Short-term child protection orders include:

  • Directive order - directs a parent to do or refrain from doing something related to the child's protection, or directs a parent not to have contact or to have only supervised contact with the child. A directive order must not be for more than one year.
  • Supervision order - requires the chief executive (Director-General) to supervise the child's protection in relation to the matters stated in the order. A supervision order must not be for more than one year.
  • Custody or guardianship – a child protection order that grants custody or guardianship to the chief executive or custody to a relative of the child. Short-term custody or guardianship must not be for more than two years. A person who has custody of a child has the right and responsibility to attend to day-to-day matters only, including a child's daily care and making decisions about a child's daily care. They do not however have the power to make decisions about the long-term care, welfare and development of the child.

Why this topic is important

The first priority of the department is the safety of the child or young person who has come into contact with the child protection system.

Short-term child protection orders are a critical part of the child protection system. They provide the department with the authority to work with the family to reduce the risk of future harm with the aim of safely returning the child home.

Of the 9,627 children subject to child protection orders as at 30 June 2017, 3,585 were subject to short-term orders and 6,042 children were subject to long-term orders.

The number of children subject to short-term orders decreased slightly by 0.5 per cent from 3,604 as at June 2016 to 3,585 children as at 30 June 2017.

Over the past five years the number of children subject to short-term orders decreased by 12.6 per cent from 4,102 to 3,585 as at 30 June 2017. Over the same period, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children subject to a short-term child protection order decreased by 7.1 percent and 16.2 per cent respectively.

Is your feedback

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