Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women

Exiting out-of-home care

Graphs

Number of children exiting out-of-home care, by Indigenous status, Queensland, 2006-07 to 2010-11Number of children exiting out-of-home care, by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, Queensland, 2012-13 to 2016-17

YearIndigenousNon-IndigenousAll children
2006-07 454 1077 1531
2007-08 434 1110 1544
2008-09 500 1250 1750
2009-10 597 1061 1658
2010-11 575 1053 1628

Proportion of children exiting out-of-home care, by age group, Queensland, 2006-07 to 2010-11 Proportion of children exiting out-of-home care, by age group, Queensland, 2012-13 to 2016-17

Year0 to 45 to 910 to 1415 to 17
2006-07 32.5277596 % 22.9915088 % 23.9712606 % 20.5094709 %
2007-08 28.7564767 % 21.8264249 % 22.2797927 % 27.1373057 %
2008-09 26.8 % 21.4857143 % 23.6571429 % 28.0571429 %
2009-10 26.960193 % 21.5319662 % 21.5922799 % 29.9155609 %
2010-11 23.5872235 % 21.007371 % 23.034398 % 32.3710073 %

Tables

DescriptionAnnualQuarterly
E.1: Children exiting out-of-home care, by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 11 KB) Excel (XLSX, 13 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB)
E.2: Children exiting out-of-home care, by age group, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 11 KB) Excel (XLSX, 13 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB)

What does exiting out-of-home care mean?

When a child is placed in out-of-home care for protective reasons, the department attempts to reunify the child and their family, where this is in the best interests of the child.

Family reunification occurs when the department has determined that the child's protection needs are now able to be met at home, and the child leaves their out-of-home care placement.

A young person will also leave out-of-home care and transition to independent living when they turn 18 years old.

Why this topic is important

Young people leaving care are often confronted by issues such as reconnecting with their families and communities, coming to terms with the reasons why they came into care or, for those exiting care at age 18, finding themselves alone without the security of a family to fall back on.

It is therefore important that the process for reunifying children with their families or transitioning young people to independence is well planned, gradual and flexible.

To determine if a child can be reunified, a child safety officer must undertake a family reunification assessment which takes into account a number of factors. This can include the family’s progress in achieving the goals recorded in the child’s case plan, a safety assessment and an evaluation of the quality of parent-child interactions.

Figures for children exiting out-of-home care refer to all children who exited out-of-home care, whether or not they were subject to a protective order.

In 2016-17, 1,667 children exited out-of-home care, in comparison to 1,708 children in 2015-16. The age group with the largest number of exits was 15 to 17 year olds with 590 children exiting in 2016-17 (this age group includes children exiting care when they turn 18).

The number of children exiting out-of-home care increased by 6.6 per cent from 1,564 in 2012-13 to 1,667 in 2016-17.

Is your feedback

Please submit your comments on the department's Compliments and Complaints section.

Please submit your comments on the Queensland Government website Contacts form.