Case study

Let's find out how gender analysis is performed with a hypothetical case study.

Community Centre Breakfast Club

A community centre in a low-income community plans to run a breakfast club for local students. Students will be asked to help prepare and serve the breakfast and clean up afterwards. Activities will be provided for children who arrive early. The community centre's management committee will manage the program through a director and 2 part-time staff. The management committee has 6 members, including chair and deputy chair who are both male.

Select the relevant step below to find out what a gender analysis may find for this case study.

Identifying issues

Here you have an opportunity to explore the issues and impacts associated with a policy, program or service.

While 'identifying' issues, don't assume any policy, program or service is gender neutral. Gender issues are central to a policy, program or service in question, but less clear in other cases.

Visit 'Identifying issues' for example questions to get you started.

A gender analysis may find the following:

  • The program will benefit many people in the community who are economically disadvantaged and are unable to provide a complete breakfast for their children.
  • The program will particularly affect women, who are more likely than men to provide child care and domestic activities at home.
  • There is a need to identify specific groups of women affected, including by age, disability, religion, ethnicity and gender identity.
  • Given that the centre's leadership is male dominated, consideration should be given to involving women in the program's design.

Gathering evidence

You aim to look at what is already known about the gendered nature of an issue and identify available and relevant data and data sources.

Note that your own values and experiences may affect your perception and/or willingness to investigate the issue. Your organisation's priorities and processes may also affect your ability to ask new questions and hear answers you may not expect.

Visit 'Gathering evidence' for example questions to get you started.

A gender analysis may find the following:

  • Females across all age groups are more likely than males to provide unpaid childcare. The 25 to 34 years age group shows the greatest gender gap, with women making up 61% of people providing unpaid childcare.
  • In families with at least 1 employed parent, 70% of working mothers used flexible work arrangements to care for their children, compared with 33% of working fathers.
  • 38% of working mothers used part-time work to care for a child, compared with 3% of working fathers.
  • Females aged 15 years and older are nearly 3 times more likely than males to spend 15 hours or more every week on unpaid domestic activities—30% of females compared with 12% of males.
  • Women make up 95% of child carers (including child care workers, family day care workers, nannies and out-of-school-hours care workers) and 74% of school teachers.
  • Data on women's representation in community organisation management committees.
  • Information on the success or failure of similar programs and issues encountered.

Identifying and defining outcomes

Your aim is to identify desired goals and anticipated outcomes for a particular policy, program or service area to ensure equitable outcomes for people of all genders.

Beware of unintended and undesirable outcomes, especially for specific groups of women, men and people of other genders. Different measures may be required for outcomes to be equitable for people of all genders.

Visit 'Identifying and defining outcomes' for example questions to get you started.

A gender analysis may find the following:

  • The program's outcomes should benefit children, parents and the community.
  • It should provide activities appropriate for all genders.
  • It should avoid stereotyping genders in certain roles—for both adults and children.
  • Ideally, women, men and people of other genders should be represented on the management committee and program staff.

Planning

Your aim is to develop and refine your findings and options. For example, consider the impacts on women, men and people of other genders as a key element in weighting and recommending the engagement processes and options, not as an ‘add-on'. Also consider how each option and engagement process will be monitored and evaluated to determine the impact of your initiative on people of different genders.

Visit 'Planning' for example questions to get you started.

A gender analysis may find the following:

  • When engaging female parents and other female community members, consider:
    • their child care responsibilities and domestic routines
    • their access to transport and child care arrangements
    • alternative ways for people to provide input.
  • The program should also address any barriers to men's involvement in the program.
  • Strategies may be needed to ensure all students, not only girls, help prepare and serve the breakfast and clean up afterwards.
  • Strategies may be needed to encourage participation in outdoor activities by all students, including girls.

Communication

Your aim is to communicate chosen options and engagement processes. Timing, choice of media, language and public involvement (if applicable) are important to ensure that the intent and impacts of your initiative are understood. The participation and acknowledgement of all stakeholders, both internal and external, can be a key part of communicating your initiative.

Visit 'Communication' for example questions to get you started.

A gender analysis may find the following:

  • Engaging with different gender identities and diverse community groups may require various communication methods.
  • Women, especially older women and women from lower socio-economic backgrounds, may have less access to the internet and email than men.
  • Education and literacy levels can vary significantly and communication needs to be tailored to the abilities of the target audience.

Delivery / implementation

Here you aim to put in place your initiative to achieve its outcomes and objectives. Consider specific aspects of the implementation for your organisation, including how you might involve key personnel and other stakeholders. Consider linking with other initiatives being planned in your organisation.

Visit 'Delivery/implementation' for example questions to get you started.

A gender analysis may find the following:

  • Program delivery needs to target all the community as well as different gender identities and sub-groups.
  • Implementation should be mindful of the gender identities and gender role expectations of students, staff, volunteers and management committee members.

Monitoring and review

Your aim is to determine how well your initiative is attaining its goals and provides opportunities to make improvements. Ensure that the gender impact of your initiative is an explicit part of the monitoring and review process and that those undertaking the evaluation have gender awareness.

Visit 'Monitoring and review' for example questions to get you started.

A gender analysis may find the following:

  • The main purpose is to deliver a gender-sensitive program that benefits the community.
  • Performance indicators should consider gender issues.
  • Future strategic planning should be informed by program data separated by gender.

Reporting

Your aim is to report the results of your initiative. Here ensure that those groups and individuals consulted at various stages in the development of your initiative are acknowledged.

Visit 'Reporting' for example questions to get you started.

A gender analysis may find the following:

  • Outcomes of the program should be reported to the whole community—ensuring certain gender identities or sub-groups do not miss out.
  • Internal reporting should include data by gender, as well as other factors like age, cultural background and disability.

Young girl having breakfast