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  • Stand by us

    Young Queenslanders know cyberbullying is hard for their parents and carers too and they know you want to fix it for them. If you’re a parent, carer, or have a young person in your life, what they really need is for you to stand by them to help stop cyberbullying. Watch and share the video and find out how you can show your support.

  • What is cyberbullying?

    Cyberbullying is the use of technology to bully a person or group with the intent to hurt them socially, psychologically or even physically. Examples of cyberbullying are: sending abusive texts or emails, hurtful images, videos or memes; starting nasty gossip and chat; or excluding, imitating or humiliating people online.

  • Signs your child is being cyberbullied

    Your child may not want to tell you or others about being cyberbullied. They might feel scared, embarrassed or worried that telling you will only make things worse. You will probably be able to pick up clues, such as changes in their behaviour, that things aren’t quite right.

  • Helping your child deal with cyberbullying

    Your first reaction might be to panic and ban your child from using their phone, tablet or computer, or a particular platform or app, but experts advise that restrictive practices are not effective means for dealing with cyberbullying and can disconnect your child from their support network. Find out how you can offer your support and come up with a plan to address the issue together.

  • My child is a cyberbully

    Finding out your child is a cyberbully can be confronting and upsetting. The best advice is to stay calm, get all the facts and then talk to your child about what’s going on. Find out how to approach the situation and put an end to the cyberbullying – don’t wait for it to go away.

  • Keeping kids safe online

    Parents and carers can play an important role in supporting children and young people to stay safe online.

  • Reporting cyberbullying

    If you haven’t been able to stop the cyberbullying, you can report it. In some instances, cyberbullying is illegal.

  • Access free training

    If you need to know more about cyberbullying and want to learn how to help your kids, you can access a variety of free online seminars, webinars and training.

Stand by us

Young Queenslanders know cyberbullying is hard for their parents and carers too and they know you want to fix it for them. If you’re a parent, carer, or have a young person in your life, what they really need is for you to stand by them to help stop cyberbullying. Watch and share the video and find out how you can show your support.

What is cyberbullying?

Cyberbullying is the use of technology to bully a person or group with the intent to hurt them socially, psychologically or even physically. Examples of cyberbullying are: sending abusive texts or emails, hurtful images, videos or memes; starting nasty gossip and chat; or excluding, imitating or humiliating people online.

Signs your child is being cyberbullied

Your child may not want to tell you or others about being cyberbullied. They might feel scared, embarrassed or worried that telling you will only make things worse. You will probably be able to pick up clues, such as changes in their behaviour, that things aren’t quite right.

Helping your child deal with cyberbullying

Your first reaction might be to panic and ban your child from using their phone, tablet or computer, or a particular platform or app, but experts advise that restrictive practices are not effective means for dealing with cyberbullying and can disconnect your child from their support network. Find out how you can offer your support and come up with a plan to address the issue together.

My child is a cyberbully

Finding out your child is a cyberbully can be confronting and upsetting. The best advice is to stay calm, get all the facts and then talk to your child about what’s going on. Find out how to approach the situation and put an end to the cyberbullying – don’t wait for it to go away.

Keeping kids safe online

Parents and carers can play an important role in supporting children and young people to stay safe online.

Reporting cyberbullying

If you haven’t been able to stop the cyberbullying, you can report it. In some instances, cyberbullying is illegal.

Access free training

If you need to know more about cyberbullying and want to learn how to help your kids, you can access a variety of free online seminars, webinars and training.

For parents and carers